North Ogden Historical Museum

bringing awareness of the rich heritage we share

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North Ogden Through Time

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Robert Chamberlain is proudly showing off the new family car in 1960. Behind him is the now busy North Ogden intersection at 2600 N. 400 E. Note the First Security Bank building (right) and the Buck Holmes Phillips 66 station (left) and even a phone booth can be seen on the corner through the car's windows. Photo courtesy of Denice Barker. ... See MoreSee Less

4 days ago

Robert Chamberlain is proudly showing off the new family car in 1960.  Behind him is the now busy North Ogden intersection at 2600 N. 400 E.  Note the First Security Bank building (right) and the Buck Holmes Phillips 66 station (left) and even a phone booth can be seen on the corner through the cars windows.  Photo courtesy of Denice Barker.

 

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I love this picture. I lived and played on the hill directly behind him.

The North Ogden I remember. 😊

I love this picture!!

Great picture, I remember when.

Love that picture with the tiny First Security Bank in the background , that is the way it looked when I opened my 1st savings acc I was 12 yrs old👍🏻

Great pic! Thanks

Ahhh, memories!

Beautiful car.

One of my cousins!

North Ogden when it was really North Ogden. There's no way I want to live there now!!!!!!

That's the way that bank building looked when we got there in 1967! Of course, the 7-11 wasn't there, it was down the road on Wash. Blvd! The little white w/red building was Granny's Pantry when we got there. I'm assuming that Granny's Pantry was there then, or some other business? By the way, that guy's name is familiar. I was in the same grade in jr. high as a girl by that name! Her name was Robyn Chamberlain, I wonder if she was related to him? We both were in the (then new) North Ogden Jr. High, probably around 1967-68. Now that I think about it, she was probably in the same 6th grade class in N. Ogden Elementary, too!

He has not changed a bit

And probably at baskets has station

A ;pt has changed in 59 years.

AHHH The simpler times

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Homespun clothing! The Waldram family from North Ogden posed for a photograph in the early 1900s wearing the clothing made by their mother, Ellen. L-R, first row: Erma and Myrtle; second row: Mabel, Lorenzo, Ellen, and Eva; third row: Flora, Luella, Diana, and Della. ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

Homespun clothing!  The Waldram family from North Ogden posed for a photograph in the early 1900s wearing the clothing made by their mother, Ellen.  L-R, first row: Erma and Myrtle; second row: Mabel, Lorenzo, Ellen, and Eva; third row: Flora, Luella, Diana, and Della.

 

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Wonderful photo at a great time in our history.

Thank you for showing this picture. They are my relatives. Diana is my grandmother from my dads side. Love it!❤️

Diana is my grandma. She was a wonderful woman. ❤️

Thanks for posting. Flora is my great grandmother.

Guaranteed to fit perfectly. Right? 😉

Simply wonderful!

Wow

All girls!!!!

Chicks had skills!

Come on, let's try for a boy she said😂

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North Ogdenites Ron and Ginger Brown began performing in 1974 and thrilled more than two million fans with their Roman riding act the first year. They performed for many more years and also trained horses for Hollywood movies. ... See MoreSee Less

3 weeks ago

North Ogdenites Ron and Ginger Brown began performing in 1974 and thrilled more than two million fans with their Roman riding act the first year.  They performed for many more years and also trained horses for Hollywood movies.Image attachment

 

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Great people!! Know them since i was little!!

She was my first grade teacher too. When she had a baby, Ron was our sub. Later that year, they performed with their horses for the whole school. Of course, our class got front row seats. I still have an autographed photo of them. Such fun! 💗

That is so precious - thanks for sharing.

My kiddos had her in school. One of their favorites!

Love Ron Brown and Ginger. One of the worlds finest.

Amazing people! She was my 5th grade teacher♥️

Great people that taught me so much as a kid. Plus who does that? It was incredible every time I saw them ride

Two great people that have had a positive impact on many lives! There was no one like Ron Brown! He is so missed!

Awesome people

Love that lady

She looks like she has a permanent smile. Very pretty lady and great husband!

She was my 1st grade teacher at green acers. Saw her last fall out at antelope island when we went horse back riding.

Collette Anderson

Where are they now?

Interesting contrast between then and now.

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This excellent poetry was written by our board member Cindy Jones!

Maybe I’m being idealistic but
walking off with bricks from a demolished
one-room schoolhouse
Where your great-great grandfather
learned to read
doesn’t seem all that sentimental to me.

Maybe I’m being a naysayer but
I wonder why
we’re celebrating our heritage with fanfare;
a parade where the new real estate business
with a laser-printed magnetic sign hanging on a one-ton diesel
pitches candy out to kids on the street

while the 1898 brick two-story off Main
with a mud fort in the back yard
where the pioneers took shelter until the house was built
where their daughters were born and two died, stillborn
crumbles slowly into oblivion
like a forgotten
ghost.

Maybe I’m dwelling on the negative
When I cringe watching the orchard
where girls in long dresses plucked
their winter meals from the trees
in bunches, held survival in their young fingers
where now a tractor rips history out of the ground
by its roots.

Maybe I’m only disillusioned because
we’re spending our sentiment
on state-of-the-art pyrotechnics
to show how proud we are of us.
But on the night we became one with
America,
the skies were dark and full of stars. The hearts
of the settlers only lit by fragile hope.

Where are those stars now?
Can we see them over the carefully timed blasts?
Can we hear the quiet deaths of our ancestors
above the wailing of parade sirens?
What are we celebrating,
If not the stories, the lives, the sacrifice
of the people who came before?

We don’t know.
We have lost them.
We have lost us.
... See MoreSee Less

4 weeks ago

This excellent poetry was written by our board member Cindy Jones!

Maybe I’m being idealistic but 
walking off with bricks from a demolished 
one-room schoolhouse
Where your great-great grandfather 
learned to read
doesn’t seem all that sentimental to me.

Maybe I’m being a naysayer but
I wonder why
we’re celebrating our heritage with fanfare;
a parade where the new real estate business
with a laser-printed magnetic sign hanging on a one-ton diesel
pitches candy out to kids on the street

while the 1898 brick two-story off Main
with a mud fort in the back yard
where the pioneers took shelter until the house was built
where their daughters were born and two died, stillborn
crumbles slowly into oblivion
like a forgotten
ghost.

Maybe I’m dwelling on the negative
When I cringe watching the orchard
where girls in long dresses plucked
their winter meals from the trees
in bunches, held survival in their young fingers
where now a tractor rips history out of the ground
by its roots.

Maybe I’m only disillusioned because
we’re spending our sentiment
on state-of-the-art pyrotechnics
to show how proud we are of us.
But on the night we became one with 
America, 
the skies were dark and full of stars. The hearts
of the settlers only lit by fragile hope.

Where are those stars now? 
Can we see them over the carefully timed blasts?
Can we hear the quiet deaths of our ancestors
above the wailing of parade sirens?
What are we celebrating, 
If not the stories, the lives, the sacrifice
of the people who came before?

We don’t know. 
We have lost them. 
We have lost us.Image attachment

 

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I absolutely love this poem. It gave me pause and reminded me to remember what the day was truly commemorating. Thanks for sharing.

Sad poem, but thanks to the people with North Ogden Historical Museum for helping us remember the happy times of the past. Keep us smiling!

Excellent poem

In an earlier post many complained about people and animals suffering in 80 deg heat this summer due to malfunction. The pioneers and their animals survived many a day in the 90s. I for one am thankful for our modern buildings with air conditioning, but am also thankful for what my pioneer ancestors endured to bring me the comforts of today. Hopefully many of us today are pioneering other benefits for our future generations.

As l understand Montgomery family history, the home pictured was not the home of Robert and Mary Wilson Montgomery, but was one of their descendants. Their home was located a bit north where the electrical substation is now—and was demolished long ago. Love the picture though. Nathaniel is my great grandfather! His home still stands, as does three of his children’s homes in NO.

When it comes to this poem, I just have to say, speak for yourself. Not everybody is disillusioned. To assume that is ignorant I believe. There are many who still remember Ogden‘s past. There are many who still know why we celebrate pioneer days. We just don’t stand out as much as the ignorant people do, because we aren’t as loud as they are.

I hate that so many in today's society want to tear down our past. Modern buildings are so bland & without character.

I wanted to save that house. Was told I could have it if I would pay to have it moved. Couldn't afford to move it. 🙁

Very moving. Sad but true.

❤❤❤

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On March 8, 1886, a tragic fire took the lives of two young girls. Olive Naomi Jones from North Ogden was staying with relatives at a home in Ogden when fire broke out. She died at age 14 along with her cousin, Eva Pamelia Shaw, age 6. ... See MoreSee Less

1 month ago

On March 8, 1886, a tragic fire took the lives of two young girls.  Olive Naomi Jones from North Ogden was staying with relatives at a home in Ogden when fire broke out.  She died at age 14 along with her cousin, Eva Pamelia Shaw, age 6.Image attachmentImage attachment

 

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That must've been awful for that famiy! To lose both children that way!

Ramie Greenwell Lindsay, Shanie N Jonathan Peterson, Kacie Greenwell Smith, did you guys ever hear this story from Grandma? It has to be her relatives with the Shaw and Jones last names.

Christy Trussell

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